A SHORT HISTORY OF THE

BOURNEMOUTH CORNISH ASSOCIATION

 

 

 

The Bournemouth Cornish Association owes its origins in 1921 to Richard Quick, who had been appointed Art Gallery Curator of Bournemouth. Mr Quick, in his various appointments before he came to Bournemouth, had been a member of the London Cornish, Midland Cornish and Cardiff Cornish Associations as well as a member and Past President of the Bristol Cornish Association.

 

He came from St Ives and had been involved with Cornish folk wherever he went and soon discovered that in Bournemouth were a number of people who could form an Association similar to those with which he had been associated.

 

It is necessary to cover some of the background of our founder to realise the drive and energy he exerted in the things he was interested in.

 

The Horniman Museum and Library states that he was born in Bristol in 1860, son of William Henry Quick, a Cornishman from St Ives, where the early days of Richard Quick’s life were spent with his Uncle, J M Kernick, who was twice Mayor of St Ives.

 

Richard went to school at South Hackney College and became a student at the South Kensington School of Art (now the Victoria and Albert Museum) and four years at the Royal Academy of Art in Munich.

 

He was appointed Curator of the Wolverhampton Art Gallery and Museum in the 1880’s and then went on as the Curator of the Horniman Museum, where he appears especially interested in Japanese Art, and was a founder member of the Japanese Society in London.

 

In 1904 he was appointed the Curator of the Bristol Art Museum and joined the Bristol Cornish Association and rapidly rose to become President in 1909 and again in 1920-1. He certainly was not a man to allow things to idle and much he contributed to the Bristol Cornish.

 

He designed and was the first in 1921 to wear the Bristol Badge of Office.

 

In September 1921 he came to Bournemouth as the first Curator of the new Russell Cotes Art Gallery and Museum.

 

He became Honorary Secretary of Bournemouth Natural Science Society which still exists at 39 Christchurch Road, Boscombe.

 

Wherever he went he soon discovered Cornish folk, and he therefore sent out the following letter in addition to and advertisement in the local newspaper :-

 

 

                                                                                    East Cliff Hall, Bournemouth

                                                                                                5 December 1921.

 

 

It has been thought desirable to form in Bournemouth a Cornish Association similar to those in London, Birmingham, Bristol, Cardiff and Newport, Mon.

 

It would be a means of bringing fellow Cornishmen together in a social manner.  Quarterly meetings might be held, a Summer Outing and an Annual Dinner, at which a distinguished Cornishman might be the chief guest. A Benevolent Fund might be added.

 

You are kindly invited to attend a Preliminary Meeting to be held at Gervis Hall Restaurant (Gardens Entrance) on Wednesday, December 14that 7.30 p.m. to consider the forming of such an Association.

 

The Rev. G.P. Trevelyan (St Veep), Dr W.H. Best  (St Ives), Mr W.E. Geake (Launceston), Mr J.Wright (Penzance), Miss Hoskin

(Marazion), Mr S.Balhatchet (Launceston)  Mr W.Rowe (Hayle),

Miss Anthony (Lelant), and Miss Trerice (Falmouth), have promised to join.

                                                                      

Yours faithfully

                                                                        RICHARD QUICK  (St Ives)

                                                                        Convenor of Meeting          

 

He married in October 1923 a Miss Grabham and one may be forgiven for observing that no doubt the delighted Press lost no time in seizing the opportunity to headline the account of the happy event as Grabham-Quick.

 

The Bournemouth Association gave him a splendid silver coffee pot, now in the family possession of his daughter.

 

Richard Quick remained an active member of the association until his death in 1939.

 

Many are the stalwarts of the Association too numerous to mention, but it would not be amiss to mention Mr O E Coad, who passed away in August 1986 at Torquay. He was the Association Secretary from 1934 to 1946, and committee member until he retired to Torquay in 1956. He joined the Association in 1932 and was born in the Callington area.

 

The Association was inaugurated on the 14 December and the newspaper report states “an influential committee was also appointed and the aims, objects and rules for the Association were carefully considered and approved. Any Cornish friends, either born in the County or whose forebears were Cornish are invited to join the Association.

 

The Officers elected were :-

 

 

Mr Richard Quick

(President)

Mr T Chegwidden

(Hon.Secretary)

Mr A E Thomas

(Hon.Treasurer)

Rev G P Trevelyan

(Vice President)

Alderman J C W Julyan

(Vice President)

(Mayor of Poole)

  

            Committee were :-

Mr Bartle

(Camborne)

Mr Collings

(Hayle)

Mr Geake

(Launceston)

Dr Nankivell

(St Columb Major)

Mrs A E Thomas

(Fowey)

Dr Best

(St Ives)

Miss Colbourne

(Falmouth)

Miss Hosking

(Marazion)

Mr Rowe

(Hayle)

Mr Trevanion

(Caerhayes)

 

 

It will be noted that ladies formed part of the Committee from the outset.

 

Mention was made that a Cornishman, Captain Lewis Tregonwell, was the founder of Bournemouth 111 years before.

 

The first meeting took the form of a Lantern Lecture, given by the President, entitled “Beautiful Cornwall”, in aid of the Miners’ Distress Fund.

 

In early days the programme included two outings per year,usually in June and September, and, bearing in mind the solid tyred char-a-banc and the roads at that time, the outings were more like expeditions than the coach rides we enjoy today.

 

The first outing was to Cranborne, where the party were conducted round the Church and then the Manor House, which dated from the time of Matilda, wife of William the Conqueror: tea at the Fleur de Lys, most appropriately, then on to Salisbury Cathedral. The second was marred by rain but it did not dampen the spirits of the travellers.  “Just like down-a-long” they said. Those early outings were not just outings, they were lessons on the history of Hampshire, Dorset and Wiltshire with items relating to Cornwall thrown in for good measure; such as noting that the granite base of King Arthur’s statue in Winchester came from Freeman’s quarries. The tradition of outings has been maintained with varying amounts of support, although the quest for information about historic places seems to have diminished now that access and information to private individuals is more readily available.

 

Reference to aims and objects is made frequently in the early records but these were not defined. The main aim seems to have been the enjoyment and fellowship of Cornish people and their friends, with the emphasis on outings and eating, drinking and singing together.

 

The nature of the food required was spelled out at Committee meetings and in 1922 the first “Cornish Tea” attracted over 100 people to enjoy meat pasties, apple pasties, saffron cake, Cornish cream and Cornish butter and to listen to Cornish songs and recitations        . Very few Counties have such a tradition of song as Cornwall and it is evident from the early proceedings that the tradition was to be maintained by the founders. Singing also took place after the Annual Dinners, the songs appearing most regularly being the Floral Dance, One and All, Pearl of the West and, of course, Trelawny.

 

These were sung on such occasions by artistes but one cannot imagine the members failing to join in and add their own particular harmony to the occasion.

 

With a membership of over 90, the first Annual Dinner took place at the Grand Hotel on 1 February 1923. The principal guest was Sir William Treloar, of Cornish descent, past mayor of London and founder of the Treloar Home at Alton. The cost of the meal was five shillings and three pence and the ticket price six shillings and six pence, which not only included the meal and entertainment but eleven speeches, all fully covered by the local Press.

 

At the Annual General Meeting on 8 December 1922, the President submitted a sketch for a badge of office to be worn by the President but to be the property of the Association. This badge would cost £5 in silver gilt and enamel. The meeting considered that, in view of the small balance at the bank, the time was not opportune to purchase such a badge.  However certain individuals made personal contributions and the badge was obtained. It is worn today by Presidents and one would imagine that it had been designed by Richard Quick. It bears some resemblance to the Bristol Cornish badge without being in any way a replica.

 

In 1923 the Cornish Tea acquired the title of “The Annual Tea and Social” and a member gave a lantern lecture on the Yellowstone National Park.

 

Mr Quick, having seen the Association through its formation and early struggles, was succeeded by Dr Nankivell in 1923 and the title of the Association became The Bournemouth and District Cornish Association, to include Poole, Christchurch and the surrounding Districts. Membership qualification became “persons of Cornish birth, descent or connection by marriage”.

 

In 1924, a proposal to include Devonshire people in the membership was not carried. 

 

With a membership of over 100 for several years the Association became not only stable but active in a number of activities. Each year brought its own special project.

 

In 1925 Joined with Caledonian, Lincoln and Midland Societies in a Carnival Ball on behalf of the Hospital

 

In 1926 Joined with Devon, Somerset and Gloucester Societies in  the promotion of a West Country Concert with the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra at the Winter Gardens

 

In 1927 Took part in the Exiles’ Carnival Ball. Won a Special Prize at Boscombe Carnival with which a silver cup was purchased. This has since been presented to the Gorsedd.               

 

 

In 1928 Won another Special Prize at Boscombe Carnival. Took Part in the Exiles’ Ball.

 

In 1929    Joined with other West Country Associations in a Garden Party.

 

In 1930    Entertained a party of 40 members from the London Cornish Association.

 

From 1931 to 1939 the programme settled to a regular pattern, ties with others Exiles’ Associations were maintained and a Garden Party was added to the programme.

 

Only two of the Exiles’ Associations were formed before the Bournemouth Cornish: the Caledonian and the Lincoln.

 

The Annual Dinner came under fire in 1932 after a series of poor attendances and a Social took its place, followed by a Dinner Dance in 1933 which had a lower attendance than the Annual Dinners it replaced. So in 1934 the Annual Dinner was reinstated and 73 attended. The Annual Dinner has remained since then (except that it is now, again, a Dinner Dance) and long may it do so, for it is an occasion for renewing acquaintances, a special occasion, removed from all other activities; an occasion for eating and drinking with your friends.

 

In 1934 Mr A E Thomas, who had been Hon. Treasurer since inauguration, gave up the appointment but resumed in 1945, combining the duties of Hon. Secretary and Hon. Treasurer until his ultimate relinquishing of office in 1950.

 

In 1937, Richard Quick, founder of the Association, was made an Honorary Life Member. He died in 1940.

 

In 1938 the Association won the Kindred Associations Bowls trophy. There seems to have been an objection by other Societies that one of the players was not a bona fide member of the Association. One supposes that if the man in question had played badly or there would have been no objection. The President and Committee confirmed that the man had been elected before the tournament. The objection failed for in 1948 there was an enquiry as to the whereabouts of the trophy and, after locating it, it was decided that it should be kept by Mr Coad, who was President at that time.

 

Looking back at the years from the foundation to the temporary closure during the War, it is obvious that the Bournemouth Cornish was a very lively, happy Association, proud of its heritage and traditions but always willing, quite successfully to try something new and to involve itself in the activities of the area where members had come to live and work.

 

After the War, the great vitality and enthusiasm dwindled somewhat and by 1951 Whist Drives were a more regular feature of the programme and some members felt that the Association had lost some of its Cornish flavour. The Annual Dinners in 1951, 1952 and 1953 were all followed by whist drives but it is evident that by 1954 there was considerable opposition to this and the opposition resulted in the turn of the Association back to pursuits more in the nature of the Association’s original aims, with Socials, theatre outings and car outings.

 

Mr W A Stinton, who had been one of those pressing for a change of attitude, was elected Hon. Secretary in 1955 and, supported by his President and Committee was largely responsible for the change in programme.

 

With a determination to remind the Association that it was Cornish he introduced the Spring Party in 1946, with flowers sent up from Cornwall and a posy for each lady. He lectured on Cornish subjects, arranged Garden Parties in the pleasant grounds of the Bournemouth Natural Science Society and brought into the programme some events based on those which he had observed in his visits to other Associations with Mrs Stinton.

 

More representatives of Cornish Associations appeared at the Annual Dinner. He became President in 1959, with Mrs Stinton as Secretary, relinquishing office in 1961.

 

A proposition in 1957 that friends be admitted as associate members was not carried on the grounds that it would result in the ultimate dilution of the Cornish element.

 

At about this time there was some difficulty with the Floral Dance. On several occasions the Committee requested it to be performed and various members agreed to organise it but, somehow, it never happened on the night. The Southampton version was performed once or twice but it was not until 1978 that the genuine ancient Helston Floral or Furry Dance was performed by members.

 

There were also comments that increasing prices were having an effect on attendances and standards and it is noticeable that attendances hovered round the 70 or 80 mark for some years for the major events. Nevertheless, they were very successful years in that they brought the Association out of the post war stagnation. During this period there was a drift away from the kind of involvement with other kindred Associations that had taken place before the War.

 

In 1962 the title reverted to The Bournemouth Cornish Association. In this year Mr and Mrs Stinton resigned owing to overwhelming demands on their time.

 

In 1966 Mr J F Nicholls became Hon. Secretary. A man of great energy and enthusiasm and a good organiser, with the support of Presidents and Committee he swept the Association along on a wave of increasing attendances. Printed programmes were issued to members: one outing in each year involved a trip which ended in a Church Service in the Parish of which Rev. Rodda was Vicar. Beset with a heart condition, he resigned in 1970 to come back as joint secretary in 1972 before his heart finally failed him.

 

The Association has been well served by its officers but, in recent times, mention must be made to  Mr O G Vernon who brought his good humour and skills to whatever office the members asked him to perform, whether as President, Secretary or Treasurer. In his Presidential year the link with the West Country Association in Hampshire was established and has matured over the years to the extent that Cornish members of that Association have joined Bournemouth and in 1978 their Secretary, Mr B H Thomas, became President of the Bournemouth Cornish Association.

 

In 1977 the Committee observed that certain events which had hitherto been successful were losing their appeal and in 1978 the Spring Party gave way to Bournemouth Feast and the Church Service at the end of an outing gave way to an evening service in Southbourne on a wet, cold Sunday in March. On each occasion attendances increased.

 

The important events occurred during the Presidency of Mrs Elizabeth Norrish, who, in her own stylish fashion, carried on the work of her predecessor Bert Thomas, a man who devoted a great deal of time and energy to the Association before his untimely death in 1982. During her first year of office, Mrs Norrish presented to the Cornish Gorsedd, the cup which the Association had won in 1927 at the Exiles’ Carnival Ball. The cup, suitably reinscribed, has since been awarded by the Gorsedd to the Cornish choir or singing group which has done most to help the community. One such group, the Kerensa Singers from Penzance, later travelled to Bournemouth and entertained the Association, returning again in 1984 for the R N L I concert mentioned later.

 

At the end of her Presidency, Mrs Norrish generously donated a magnificent chain to complement the President’s badge, and which was designed to allow later Presidents to have their names inscribed thereon. The Committee immediately ensured Mrs Norrish’s name was inscribed as the donor and thought it fitting as well to add the name of the first President, Mr Richard Quick.

 

Membership continued to increase and the Annual Dinners were well attended, following stalwart work by Mrs Toni Parsons, the Dinner Secretary. In 1987 Gordon Sherry began his twelfth consecutive year as Association Secretary and his tremendously hard work, ably assisted by his wife Mary, gave the Association a sound and efficient backing, which enabled the Committee to take on with confidence some major undertakings. One of these was a visit to Cornwall by some 20 Association members who spent a thoroughly enjoyable week-end in Nanpean, near St Austell where they were joined by Lloyd and Audrey Reynolds, who have for a number of years brought with them to the Annual Dinner, beautiful Cornish anemones to grace the tables. This task was originally undertaken by Charles and Kate Tregoning prior to their retirement and it is fitting that all four were made Honorary Members of the Association. Also attending that Nanpean week-end were Captain and Mrs Hansen. Captain Hansen was President from 1962-4 and his contact with the Association, like that of Mr O E Coad, who had retired to Torquay, was firmly re-established, until both Honorary Members died in 1986.

 

In 1980 the Association was entrusted with the organisation of the great gathering of the Cornish Associations, Cuntelles Kernewek, at the Royal Agricultural College in Cirencester. Membership which had fallen away somewhat had increased again to over 100, thanks to some active canvassing and good Press coverage of events. The old spirit was revived, the spirit to try something new without disturbing the traditions of the Association, to endeavour to provide a programme for all Cornish people in the Bournemouth and surrounding districts, together with their friends and to involve the Association in local activities.

 

The inaugural meeting set up a Benevolent Fund, mainly to help stranded Cornish people or those in general need of assistance. This was absorbed into the General Fund in 1967 but in each year something is contributed to a Charity. Special events have been organised in the homes of members to enable sufficient funds to be raised for special efforts from time to time and the Association has always been mindful of the needs of others.

 

In 1984 the Association undertook a major feat of organisation, John Treleaven, principal tenor, English National Opera Company himself a Cornishman, agreed to sing at two concerts presented by the Association in Bourrnemouth in aid of the R N L I. He was supported by the Kerensa Singers and the Mousehole Male Voice Choir (from the village of the tragic Penlee Lifeboat Disaster of 1981). The first Saturday night concert took place in the Punshon Memorial Church immediately adjacent to the Royal Exeter Hotel, site of the first house built by Lewis Tregonwell in 1810 (a plaque commemorating this and erected by the Association can still be seen on the hotel wall)

 

The two concerts raised over £1100 for the R N L I and the Association can feel justifiably proud of this achievement, not only in terms of the money raised, but also in the quality of the singing which enthralled the audiences on both the Saturday night and the following Sunday afternoon

 

                    

 

The two concerts raised over £1100 for the R N L I and the Association can feel justifiably proud of this achievement, not only in terms of the money raised, but also in the quality of the singing which enthralled the audiences on both the Saturday night and the following Sunday afternoon.

 

 

The concert brought forth more new members so that the total membership exceeded 150 for the first time for many years. One of the highest recorded attendances in recent years (other than the Dinner) was at the 1983 Pasty Supper when 100 people attended. Beth Lugg’s pasties always drew the crowds and the Association were delighted and honoured in 1985 when Beth was made a Bard of Cornwall — the first member to be so honoured specifically for her services to the Association.  It was therefore, fitting that when husband Reg assumed the Presidency of the Association for the second time in 1986, that he and his good lady, a Bard of Cornwall, were presented to H R H Prince Charles, Prince of Wales and Duke of Cornwall, at a special reception organised by the London Cornish Association at the Vintners Hall, London, to mark 100 years of Cornish Dinners in London.

 

The Bournemouth Cornish Association is now 66 years young and thriving. This short history, originally written by Bert Thomas, will doubtless be augmented by others in years to come for the true Cornish spirit shows no signs of being extinguished..

 

The Association was founded to draw Cornish folk and their friends together in the Bournemouth area and in the surrounding districts and there is no need for any Cornishman or Cornishwoman in this area to be lonely or to be without the comradeship of Cornish people.

 

The success of the Bournemouth Cornish Association has not been achieved without selfless, time consuming background work by various Presidents, Secretaries, Treasurers and members of Committees, (a list far too long to give adequate mention to each person), neither has it been achieved without that feeling of comradeship, the old ‘One and All’, which binds the exiled Cornish into Societies throughout the world, to promote good fellowship and to remember the customs, sights and sounds of their native land.

 

 

The remembrance is always there, quietly unobtrusive, while the Cornish people employ their particular skills and talents in whatever parts of the world they make their homes.

 

John Goodfellow at the end of his year as officer in 1985 presented with Mary, his wife, a beautiful banner portraying the Bournemouth badge of office and the Cornish Coat of Arms made for them by Molly and Harold Smith, a most welcome ‘gift’.

 

During 1987 Mrs Toni Parsons, our Dinner Secretary and President in 1970, resigned from office owing to the ill health of her husband. Also Beth Lugg, wife of the President, a committee member and Honorary pasty maker to the Association. Both were made Life Members for their services.

 

Membership at the end of 1987 was 150 members

 

 

OFFICERS 1921 — 1988

                    President                             Secretary                      Treasurer

1921/2

Mr R Quick

Mr T Chegwidden

Mr A E Thomas

1922/3

Mr R Quick

Mr T Chegwidden

Mr A E Thomas

1923/4

Dr B W Nankivell

Mr T Chegwidden

Mr A E Thomas

1924/5

Mr T Chegwidden

Dr B W Nankivell

Mr A E Thomas

1925/6

Mr T Chegwidden

Dr B W Nankivell

Mr A E Thomas

1927

Dr S Snell

Dr B W Nankivell

Mr A E Thomas

1928

Mr J Richards

Dr B W Nankivell

Mr A E Thomas

1929

Capt E H Tregoning

Dr B W Nankivell

Mr A E Thomas

1930

Mr F E Abbott

Mr W E Geake

Mr A E Thomas

1931

Lt Col Hatton Budge

Mr W E Geake

Mr A E Thomas

Dr B W Nankivell

Mr A E Thomas

1932

Lt Col Hatton Budge

Mr W E Geake

Mr A E Thomas

1933

Major W B Williams

Mr W E Geake

Mr A E Thomas

1934

Mr G T Richards

Mr W E Geake

Mr S L B James

1935

Mr G T Richards

Mr O E Coad

Mr S L B James

1936

Dr W H Best

Mr O E Coad

Mr S L B James

1937/9

Mr R M Kempe

Mr O E Coad

Mr S L B James

1940/4

Mr R M Kempe

Mr O E Coad

Mr A E Thomas

1946

Mr R M Kempe

Mr O E Coad

Mr A E Thomas

1947

Miss M Sendey

Mr A E Thomas

Mr A E Thomas

1948

Mr O E Coad

Mr A E Thomas

Mr A E Thomas

1949

Mr O E Coad

Mr A E Thomas

Mr A E Thomas

1950

Mr W G Snell

Mr Goldsmith

Mr T H Williams

Rev Saunders

Mr T H Williams

1951

Mr W G Snell

Mr Goldsmith

Mr T H Williams

1952

Mr O G Vernon

Mrs Vernon

Mr T H Williams

1953

Mr O G Vernon

Mrs Vernon

Mr Rees Davies

1954

Mr G N Shave

Mr O G Vernon

Mr C R Varcoe

1955

Mr G N Shave

Mr W A Stinton

Mr C R Varcoe

1956

Mr W E Haynes

Mr W A Stinton

Mr W J Rowe

1957/8

Mr W E Haynes

Mr W A Stinton

Mr O G Vernon

1959/61

Mr W A Stinton

Mrs Stinton

Mr O G Vernon

1962

Capt A G Hansen

Mr W A Stinton

Mr O G Vernon

1963

Capt A G Hansen

Mr O G Vernon

Mr O G Vernon

1964

Capt A G Hansen

Mr O G Vernon

Mr H G Butler

1965

Mr S Bounden

Mr J F Nicholls

Mr H G Butler

1966/7

Mr W R Parsons

Mr J F Nicholls

Mr H G Butler

1968/9

Mr W F Flisher

Mr J F Nicholls

Mr H G Butler

1970

Mrs H S Parsons

Mr G W Furze

Mrs P A Roberts

Miss P Wilkinson

1971

Mrs H S Parsons

Miss P Wilkinson

Mrs P A Roberts

1972

Mr R W Lugg

Miss P Wilkinson

Mrs P A Roberts

Mr J F Nicholls

1973

Mr R W Lugg

Mrs Flicher

Mrs P A Roberts

1974/5

Mr G F Sherry

Mrs H S Parsons

Mrs P A Roberts

1976

Mrs P A Roberts

Mr G F Sherry

Mrs J Skinner

1977

Mrs P A Roberts

Mr G F Sherry

Mr T L Rendell

1978/9

Mr B H Thomas

Mr G F Sherry

Mr T L Rendell

1980/1

Mrs E S Norrish

Mr G F Sherry

Mr T L Rendell

1982/3

Mr T L Rendell

Mr G F Sherry

Mr C Gold

1985/5

Mr J Goodfellow

Mr G F Sherry

Mr C Gold

1987

Mr R W Lugg

Mr G F Sherry

Mr C Gold

1987

Mr R W Lugg

Mr G F Sherry

Mrs V Dyke           

1988

Mrs T Ash

Mr G F Sherry

Mr C Gold

 

 

HONORARY LIFE MEMBERS 1987

Mrs G Butler

Mrs M Nicholls

Mr & Mrs W Stinton

Mr & Mrs C Tregoning

Mrs O G Vernon

Mrs G Parr

Mrs S Shave

Mrs A Warren

Mr & Mrs L Reynolds

Mrs H Parsons

Mrs E Lugg

BARDS OF CORNISH GORSEDD 1987

1957

Mr W A Stinton

1975

the late Mr B H Thomas

1985

Mrs E Lugg

 

 

 

In 1989 Mary and Gordon Sherry were presented with an inscribed salver in appreciation of their work. Gordon had then served for thirteen years as Secretary and Mary was taking the bookings for events, a task she still carries out in 2011.

 

In 1990 the London Cornish Association set up the Pewas Map Trevethan (Paul Smales Award) in memory of Paul Smales, who died during that year.The award is made annually by the Gorsedd to a Cornish man or woman, not living in Cornwall, who has contributed in an outstanding way to the furtherance of  the Cornish way of life, heritage and culture. Gordon Sherry and Elizabeth Lane (formerly Norrish) received the award in 2004 and 2005 respectively.

 

In 1991 Beth and Reg Lugg, and Janet and Les Rendell were presented with commemorative silver trays in appreciation of their work for the Association.

 

By 1999 the Bournemouth International Centre was well established just a short distance from the Royal Exeter Hotel. In that year the Mayor and Mayoress presented the town with a statue which is situated outside the B.I.C.

 

On the statue Tregonwell is facing the road with another man behind him. On the plaque Tregonwell is again recognised as being the founder of the town. The scarf he is wearing in the photograph was undoubtedly placed there by a member of the Association at a subsequent Valentine’s Day event.

 

 

 

In 2000 Mrs Barbara Hancock became the President. Having seen the many, varied and largely unrecognisable flags flying from the flagpoles outside the B.I.C., she queried the absence of a Cornish flag. She eventually convinced both the Bournemouth Council and the B.I.C. management that such a flag does exist and gained permission for it to be flown on Valentine’s Day each year to commemorate Tregonwell’s birthday.

 

Every year since then, members of the Association have met on Valentine’s Day to raise the flag and to lay flowers on the Tregonwell tomb in St Peter’s Churchyard nearby.

 

In 2001 the Association celebrated the 80th anniversary of the founding of the Association by enjoying a pub lunch at the Fleur de Lys at Cranborne.

 

In 2006 Beth and Reg Lugg were presented with an inscribed glass bowl to mark their 50 years of membership.

 

In 2009 everyone was greatly saddened by the passing of Gordon Sherry and various Cornish Associations were represented at his funeral. Gordon had been a tireless worker for good causes for many years. In our Bournemouth Cornish Association in particular he had served in almost all, if not all, offices. His name first appeared in the Treasurer’s records in 1964 when he audited the accounts, a function which he carried out just a few weeks before his death.

 

In 2010 Bournemouth celebrated the 200th anniversary of its founding. In that year Valentine’s Day fell on a Sunday and several members attended the morning service at St Peter’s after the flag raising. After the service the flowers were laid by a surviving relative of Tregonwell and the ceremony was blessed by the vicar.

 

Also to mark the 200th anniversary, our president and vice president were invited to assist in the planting of an oak tree in St Peter’s churchyard.

 

Membership in 2011 is 66 including 12 Honorary Life Members.

 

Honorary Life Members 2011

 

 

Mrs T Ash

Mr T Ash

Mrs E Lugg

Mr R Lugg

Mrs J Rendell

Mr L Rendell

Mrs A Reynolds

Mr L Reynolds

Mrs P Roberts

Mrs M Sherry

Mr K Symons

Mrs M Targett

 

 

 

Officers 1989  -  2011

President

Secretary

Treasurer

1989

Mrs T Ash

Mrs M Goodfellow

Mr C Gold

1990

Mrs E Uff

Mrs M Goodfellow

Mr C Gold

1991

Mrs E Uff

Mr J Wynton

Mr C Gold

1992

Mr M Spargo

Mr J Wynton

Mr C Gold

1993

Mr M Spargo

Mrs M Goodfellow

Mrs T Ash

1994..5

Mrs R Ridette-Wynton

Mrs M Goodfellow

Mrs T Ash

1996.7

Mrs J Hann

Mrs M Goodfellow

Mrs T Ash

1998..9

Mr A Lane

Mr R Bruce

Mr F Hancock

2000

Mrs B Hancock

   (vacant)

Mr F Hancock

2001

Mrs B Hancock

Mrs A Parsons

Mr F Hancock

2002..3

Mrs E Lane

Mrs A Parsons

Mr F Hancock

2004..5

Mr W Sweet

Mrs A Parsons

Mr F Hancock

2006.7

Mr F Hancock

Mrs A Parsons

Mrs B Hancock

2008

Mr C Parsons

Mrs A Parsons

Mrs B Hancock

2009

Mr C Parsons

Mrs A Parsons

Mr F Hancock

2010.1

Mrs B Hancock

Mrs A Parsons

Mr F Hancock

 2012.3 Mrs A Parsons                Mrs A Parsons              Mr F Hancock

 2013.4  Mr P Hambly                  Mrs A Parsons               Mr F Hancock